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The Claypole Church of England Primary School

Strive for Excellence, Promote Harmony and Value Achievement

Welcome to the new website of The Claypole Church of England Primary School, Newark, Nottinghamshire.

The Claypole Church of England Primary School

Strive for Excellence, Promote Harmony and Value Achievement

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics is essential to everyday life. Through teaching and learning in this area we aim to ensure that all pupils become confident and fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time.

Our teaching programme is based on the Primary National Curriculum 2014 and sets out what children learn on a year-by-year basis in the areas of:

• Number – place value; addition & subtraction; multiplication & division; fractions, decimals and percentages

• Measurement

• Geometry – properties of shape; position & direction

• Statistics

 

We understand the importance of maths in life and are committed to ensuring that every child leaves our school with confidence in the subject and a sound mathematical knowledge.  We teach daily maths lessons in the classroom, and also outside, taking account of every type of learner and making maths fun and engaging at all levels.  

 

Foundation Stage (Nursery and Reception)

The children in our Reception (Foundation Stage) class follow the Early Years and Foundation Stage Curriculum EYFS. The focus of mathematical teaching and learning for this age group is very practical to ensure that the children are fully engaged while learning the initial concepts through role play, dressing up, storytelling etc.

 

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 & 2)

In Key Stage 1 the children continue to build on the skills and knowledge gained in Foundation Stage.  They learn about number bonds, how to count, read, write and order numbers to 100 and beyond, where appropriate. Through practical activities children explore and gain a better understanding of shape and space and through talk they begin to grasp and use mathematical language. By the end of Year 2 they start to use the written methods of calculation.

 

Key Stage 2 (Years 3 to 6)

By Key Stage 2 children are becoming much more confident and fluent with numbers, calculating mentally and using written methods. They increase their understanding of the links between the four mathematical operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) and how to use that knowledge to check calculations. Children are given every opportunity to link their mathematics to “real life problems.”   

 

Why is Mathematics so important?
Mathematics equips children with a uniquely powerful set of tools to understand and change the world. These tools include logical reasoning, problem-solving skills, and the ability to think in abstract ways. As such, mathematics is a creative discipline. It can stimulate moments of happiness and wonder when a child solves a problem for the first time, discovers a more efficient solution to a problem or suddenly sees hidden connections.

 

Throughout history, mathematics has shaped the way we view the world. The early study of astronomy demanded the expansion of our understanding of mathematics and made possible such realizations as the size and weight of the earth, our distance from the sun, the fact that we revolve around it, and other discoveries that allowed us to move forward in our body of knowledge without which we would not have any of our modern marvels of technology.

 

Mathematics remains as important today.  Many life stages and skills require a solid grasp of mathematics, from entering university to balancing a household budget, applying for a home loan, or assessing a possible business opportunity. When children eventually leave education and seek out a career, they will inevitably need to call upon the mathematical skills and strategies they have learnt at school. They will soon realise that many careers require a solid understanding of maths. Doctors, lawyers, accountants and other professionals use maths on a daily basis, as do builders, plumbers, engineers and managers. Maths is a critical skill for many professions and opens a world of opportunity for children.

Claypole Calculation Policy

Useful Links for Mathematics

The internet is a rich resource of games, puzzles and activities to support and consolidate learning at home. This is especially true with Mathematics!  At school, we strive to incorporate within the teaching and learning of maths a variety of ICT based interactive resources that help to bring maths alive!  Many of these applications also serve to place the learning in a meaningful context that the children can relate to. As such, they are an invaluable resource that can be dipped into for free at home!  With this in mind, we have listed below a handful of the more effective educational sites on offer:

 

http://www.mathszone.co.uk/using-applying/
A fantastic site! A wealth of games and activities organised by curriculum area, i.e. shape and space.

 

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/
Another great site from a primary school in Kent! Lots of games organised in a very child friendly way.

 

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/websites/4_11/site/numeracy.shtml
Brilliant site! Lots of games and an excellent revision unit – KS2 Bitesize Maths.

 

www.counton.org/games
An innovative site that includes the classic game – ‘Who wants to be a Mathonaire?

 

www.mathplayground.com
A U.S educational site with some great games. Try out ‘Pumpkin Multiples!

 

www.rainforestmaths.com
A very colourful site from Australia with some excellent interactive games!

 

www.crickweb.co.uk
Free online education resources and games.

 

www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/index.html
We offer mathematics in an enjoyable and easy-to-learn manner, because we believe that mathematics is fun.

 

www.oxfordowl.co.uk
An award-winning free website packed with expert advice, top tips, ebooks and activities to help you support your child's reading and maths at home.

The 10 Puzzle

Can you get to 10 from the numbers 1, 1, 5, 8? You have to use all the numbers, and you have to each number exactly once. You can use + - ÷ × and parentheses (). You are not allowed to use exponents, so 10 = 8 + 1 + 1^5 is not a valid solution.

The Six Math Problem

RULES: Don't write any extra digit - just mathematical symbols!

Can you solve the bridge riddle?

Taking that internship in a remote mountain lab might not have been the best idea... Pulling that lever with the skull symbol just to see what it did probably wasn't so smart either... But now is not the time for regrets because you need to get away from these mutant zombies...fast.

  • The Claypole Church of England Primary School, School
  • Lane, Claypole, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG23 5BQ
  • Email: enquiries@claypole.lincs.sch.uk
  • Phone: 01636 626268
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